Loughborough University Wiki

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Loughborough University Wiki

Loughborough University (abbreviated as Lough for post-nominals)[7] is a public research university located in the market town of Loughborough, Leicestershire, in the East Midlands of England. It has been a university since 1966, but the institution dates back to 1909, when the then Loughborough Technical Institute began with a focus on skills and knowledge which would be directly applicable in the wider world. In March 2013, the university announced it had acquired the former broadcast centre at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park which opened as a second campus in 2015. It was a member of the 1994 Group until the group was dissolved in November 2013.

Loughborough ranks particularly highly for engineering and technology[8][not in citation given] and is noted for its sports-related courses and achievements.[9] In 2013, the university won its seventh Queen’s Anniversary Prize, awarded in recognition of its impact through research and skills development in High Value Manufacturing to create economic growth.[10] The university is also rated five star for excellence by Quacquarelli Symonds through QS Star Scheme.[11]

History

Origins

The university traces its roots back to 1909 when a Technical Institute was founded in the town centre. There followed a period of rapid expansion during which the institute was renamed Loughborough College and the development of the present campus began.

In the early years, efforts were made to mimic the environment of an Oxbridge college (e.g. requiring students to wear gowns to lectures) whilst maintaining a strong practical counterbalance to academic learning. During World War I, the institute served as an “instructional factory”, training workers for the munitions industry.[12]

The Loughborough colleges

Following the war, the institute fragmented into four separate colleges:

  • Loughborough Training College (teacher training)
  • Loughborough College of Art (art and design)
  • Loughborough College of Further Education (technical and vocational)
  • Loughborough College of Technology (technology and science)

The last was to become the nucleus of the present university. Its rapid expansion from a small provincial college to the first British technical university was due largely to the efforts of its principals, Herbert Schofield who led it from 1915 to 1950 and Herbert Haslegrave who oversaw its further expansion from 1953 to 1967, and steered its progress first to a College of Advanced Technology and then a university.[13] In 1966, the College of Advanced Technology as it had then become, received university status. In 1977, the university broadened its range of studies by amalgamating with Loughborough College of Education (formerly the Training College). More recently, in August 1998, the university merged with Loughborough College of Art and Design (LCAD). Loughborough College is still a college of further education.

The influence of Herbert Schofield

Schofield became principal in 1915 and continued to lead the College of Technology until 1950. Over his years as principal, the College changed almost beyond recognition. He purchased the estate of Burleigh Hall on the western outskirts of the town, which became the nucleus of the present 438-acre (1.77 km2) campus. He also oversaw the building of the original Hazlerigg and Rutland halls of residence, which are now home to the university’s administration and the Vice-Chancellor’s offices.

From college to university

British Aerospace EAP at the Department of Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering

An experienced educationist, Herbert Haslegrave took over as college principal in 1953, and by both increasing the breadths and raising standards, gained it the status of Colleges of Advanced Technology in 1958. He further persuaded the Department of Education to buy further land and began a building programme.[13] In 1963, the Robbins Report on higher education recommended that all colleges of advanced technology should be given the status of universities. Consequently, Loughborough College of Technology was granted a Royal Charter on 19 April 1966 and became Loughborough University of Technology (LUT), with Haslegrave as its first vice-chancellor.[12]

It gradually remodelled itself in the image of the plate glass universities of the period, which had also been created under Robbins.

Later history

In 1977, Loughborough Training College (now renamed Loughborough College of Education) was absorbed into the university. The Arts College was also amalgamated with the university in 1998. These additions have diluted the technological flavour of the institution, causing it to resemble more a traditional university with its mix of humanities, arts and sciences. Consequently, in 1996, the university dropped the “of Technology” from its title, becoming “Loughborough University”.[12]

The shortened name “Lufbra” is commonly used by the students’ union,[14] the alumni association[15] and others.

Campus

Walled garden

The university’s main campus is in the Leicestershire town of Loughborough. The Loughborough campus (once the estate of Burleigh Hall) covers an area of 438 acres (1.77 km2), and includes academic departments, halls of residence, the Students’ Union, two gyms, gardens and playing fields.

Of particular interest are the walled garden, the “garden of remembrance”, the Hazlerigg-Rutland Hall fountain-courtyard and the Bastard Gates.

In the central quadrangle of the campus stands a famous cedar, which has often appeared as a symbol for the university. Unfortunately a heavy snowfall in December 1990 led to the collapse of the upper canopy which gave the tree its distinctive shape.[citation needed]

Library

Pilkington Library

The Pilkington Library opened in 1980. It covers 9,161 square metres over four floors with 1375 study places (up from 780 prior to the renovation in late 2013). The Library has a history of undertaking research in the field of library and information work. There is an open access area where students are allowed to take in cold food and drinks as well as to engage in group discussions.

Loughborough London

Loughborough University London is based on the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, which covers 560 acres, with 6.5km of waterways and 4,300 new trees. The campus is within easy reach of many major transport links, providing countless opportunities to explore one of the world’s favourite major cities. The campus teaches postgraduate degrees only, teaching a wide range of masters degrees offered by the university.

Burleigh Court

Burleigh Court [16] is a four-star hotel and conference centre on campus that has 225 bedrooms and incorporates Burleigh springs, a spa and leisure facility.

Holywell Park Conference Centre

Holywell Park Conference Centre [17] is a conference and meeting venue located on campus. It was used as the kitting out location for Team GB [18] prior to the 2012 Summer Olympics.