Loughborough University Industrial Design

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Loughborough University Industrial Design

The suite of Design programmes at the Loughborough Design School equip students with skills and understanding in the effective development and communication of design ideas, the ergonomics of usability and interaction, product styling, three-dimensional designing, and the production and use of prototypes as a key part of design practice.

The Industrial Design and Technology BA course concerns itself with the development of skills and ability in the development and communication of ideas, interaction, product styling, three dimensional design, materials, ergonomics, the techniques of planning and costings, processes and the production of prototypes and finished artefacts. The course specialises in the understanding of the creative form and the aesthetics of manufactured products. The course tends to look at the product from the outside, in.

Who should apply for this course?

Generally speaking the BA Industrial Design course tends to appeal more to students who are stronger/more interested in A-level Art and Design and/or Design and Technology. We find our students come to us having studied a wide range of different subjects alongside what is required to apply.

Course fees 2017/18

UK/EU fee: £9,250   |   International fee: £19,900

Placement year fees for 2020/21 are still to be confirmed. As an indication, for 2017/18 the current placement fees are set at 20% of the yearly full-time fee for UK/EU students and £3,000 for international students.

Modules

All teaching and learning is completed via a number of modules across two semesters. Modules are covered using a combination of lectures, practical classes, workshops, CAD sessions, computer laboratory sessions, working with tools & machinery in tutorials in groups and one on one with academic staff, practical demonstrations, studio sessions and independent study.

Year 1

Year 1 aims to help you develop designing and making skills, including 2-D sketching and drawing, 3-D physical modelling (e.g. in foam and resistant materials), computer aided design and an understanding of basic electronics, mechanics and materials technologies as they relate to product design.

Compulsory Modules

Design Practice 1 (20 credits)

This module is centred around teaching you good working practices in design, bringing together everything you have learned from other modules and putting this into context. The module is based in the studio and workshops where you will be designing and building projects. (Module currently under review)

Design Practice 2 (20 credits)

The primary aim of this module is to help you build on the skills and experience from the module Design Practice 1. You will be working both on individual projects and in teams to develop imaginative and creative solutions to the briefs set. You will also lean about the role of design in enterprise and learn how to use workshop machinery and tools safety. (Module currently under review)

Design Context (10 credits)

This theoretical module takes a look at the changing role of the industrial designer and how society, history and the design industry have different bearings on design. It also covers the significance of enterprise and the major design movements of the 20th Century. (Module currently under review)

Computing for Designers 1 (10 credits)

This module will help you to gain a good understanding of essential software in the design process including, data management, 3D modelling, using 3D data in engineering drawing, 3D rendering and 2D graphics. (Module currently under review)

Prototyping for Design (20 credits)

This practical module introduces you to product prototyping strategies and 3D modelling techniques. It uses engineering drawings, existing and created by you, to successfully translate designs to understand the appropriate methods and tools to use in prototyping.

Ergonomics for Design (10 credits)

This module looks at how ergonomics has a bearing on design in relation to the information and operation of an item, panel design, console and workplace design, tool design, seating and musculoskeletal complaints and how these can be evaluated effectively.

Foundation Technology (20 credits)

In this module you gain a basic understanding of technology i.e. electrical, electronic and mechanical systems and materials as they relate to product design. You will also learn how to use software to model simple electronic circuits and basic measuring equipment to analyse them.

Industrial Design Studies 1 (10 credits)

This module will cover the basic understanding of product semantics and introduce you to branding within the context of industrial design. You will look at form, colour and texture and how to analyse present visual research information. You will also cover how to generate design concepts from a range of data and semantic concepts.

Year 2

Year 2 encourages the learning of further knowledge and skills in product styling, user research, computer aided manufacturing, branding, model-making, and manufacturing and materials. Design projects are undertaken alongside an associated lecture course.

Compulsory Modules

Industrial Design Studies 2 (30 credits)

In this module you will look at advanced industrial design technologies including social trends, PEEST analysis, and user and brand research. You will also be working in groups to develop a design project.

Year 2 Design Practice (25 credits)

You will learn to manage a programme of industrial design, involving concept generation, design development and product presentation. This will include a focus on product form and user interface, as well as an introduction to the principles of eco design.

Design Communication (15 credits)

This module aims to extend and enhance your industrial design modelling. This includes the uses and applications of solid surface modelling. You will also learn 3D modelling skills and modelling rationale, as well as computer image generation and manipulation using vector and bit-mapped graphics software.

BA Design & Manufacturing Technologies (30 credits)

This module will help you gain an understanding of the relationship between design and manufacturing. You will work as part of a team to product a small giveaway that uses an injection mould tool that you will design and produce as part of the project. You will also learn about various materials and the processing they can undergo such as the joining of metals, polymers and ceramics.

Optional Modules

Students choose 20 credits from the list below. These are all subject to availability and timetabling.

Universal Design (20 credits)

This module develops your knowledge and understanding of designing for elderly and disabled people within a mainstream population.

Sustainable Design (20 credits)

This module looks into the issues concerning sustainable design and how sustainable strategies can be implemented into design.

Computer-aided Ergonomics (20 credits)

This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products.

User Experience Design (20 credits)

This module looks into the areas of interactive product design, user experience design, persona and scenario based design techniques, user interface design, usability testing user requirements and investigating the user centred design process.

Physical and Virtual Prototyping in Design (20 credits)

In this module you will learn how to do physical computing and prototyping, mechanical and kinematic systems and product function simulation. You will be learning how to design and develop electronics via CAD and complete interaction design with mobile devices. You will also cover the based theory behind mechanical systems, power transfer, stress, heat transfer and fluid flow.

Optional placement / study year

Optional salaried professional placement or study abroad.

Final year

In your final year you will use all of the experience and knowledge you have gained in previous years to complete a number of projects that include live industry projects. During this year you will complete your final project, which is usually displayed at the School’s annual Degree Show in June.

Compulsory modules

Industrial Design Studies 3 (20 credits)

In this module you will take what you have learnt across years 1 and 2 to enter an international student design competition. Topics will include design research, user research, generation of insights from research data, concept generation and development, communication of research and design outcomes, identification of user needs and problem solving.

Design Research (20 credits)

The aim of this module is for students to develop an in-depth knowledge about an aspect or topic of design in relation to, for instance, to extend investigative, project management and report writing capability.

Final Year Design Practice (60 credits)

This module involves the accumulation of all your acquired knowledge to complete a design project. This is in essence your final year projects which will form a key part of your portfolio and demonstrate how much you have learnt and the journey which you have taken over your previous years at Loughborough. The outcomes of this module are normally what you display at our annual degree show. You can see examples from this module on the Design School’s website.

Live Projects (10 credits)

The aim of this module is to provide two live design projects with briefs set by leading companies that mimic activity in a design consultancy where initial responses to client briefs need to be generated rapidly.

The first project will be performed in the first week of the final year and will involve rapid ideation over the period of 24 hours in response to a single brief. This activity has the intention of re-engaging students as they return to the University, refreshing the use of designs skills such as concept generation, sketching and presentation.

The second project, performed in the first week of semester 2 provides a selection of briefs that are provided by companies and design consultancies, with a more in depth design process being undertaken by students over a week long period. The students are required to select one brief and to generate a design solution that is then sent to the companies for assessment in combination with the University assessment procedures.

Optional Modules

Students choose 10 credits from the list below. These are all subject to availability and timetabling.

Universal Design (10 credits)

This module develops your knowledge and understanding of designing for elderly and disabled people within a mainstream population.

Computer-aided Ergonomics (10 credits)

This module uses CAD to help you understand human modelling in particular posture, fit reach, vision and the use of body scanning technologies. As well as a hands on approach, this module uses case studies from a variety of fields including automotive, rail, aerospace, and consumer products.

User Experience Design (10 credits)

This module looks into the areas of interactive product design, user experience design, persona and scenario based design techniques, user interface design, usability testing user requirements and investigating the user centred design process.

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (10 credits)

This practical module builds on the CAD/CAM skills you have developed during Year 1 and 2. During this module you will look into core and advanced modelling techniques, modelling strategy, 3D rendering, 3D NC machine, virtual prototyping, rapid prototyping and the advanced use of CAD throughout the product design lifecycle.

The Global Studio (10 credits)

This exciting module aims to prepare you for working in cross-cultural and geographically distributed groups. You will learn about the impact of distributed design, distance communications, cultural issues and concepts.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation (10 credits)

This module is delivered by the Business School and focuses on the nature of enterprise, innovation, the protection of intellectual property, business plans and government policy to support innovation.

Please note: optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

For indicative information on modular weight, content and assessment type please see module specifications.

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