University of Hull Module Catalogue

By | 15th June 2017

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University of Hull Module Catalogue

University of Hull Module Catalogue

92566: Life and Social Sciences

16/17 Session, Semester 2

Basic Information

Module Level Level 4
Nature of Study Taught Module
Credits 20
European Credit Transfer Scheme 10
Probable Attendance 350
Location Hull Campus
This module is not available as a Free Elective
This module is not available as a postgraduate training module
This module is available to Exchange students

Module Rationale

It is believed that a written examination is the best method of assessing the students’ knowledge in all 3 sciences at this stage of the programme. This assessment links to the previous Skills for Practice examination, for example, in testing knowledge of Anatomy and Physiology. At this stage their learning cannot be applied to patient’s conditions; this will be introduced later in the programme. A balance of assessment types is required across the programme and this type of assessment aims to meet that requirement in year 1 of the programme.

Aims and Distinctive Features

In order to provide holistic, individualised care and to fully understand the nature of a client’s problems, the nurse practitioner needs to be knowledgeable in the life and social sciences taught within this module.

The aims of this module are to:

Introduce the student to a range of psychological and sociological theories and core physiological concepts, and explore how these can be used to explain everyday behaviours and body functions

Provide a foundation of knowledge in all 3 sciences on which the students can build throughout the following 2 years and after registration

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Define key aspects of physiological, psychological and sociological theories covered in the module
  • Identify and define key terms within the 3 life and social sciences
  • Select examples from their own experiences that demonstrate how the knowledge base in the module can be used to explain everyday behaviours, and how the body functions

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The following learning and teaching strategies are used within this module:

  • Teaching activity will be in the form of lead lectures followed by medium/large group tutorials where taught concepts are revisited, re-examined and built upon. Private and guided reading before tutorials is expected in order for the students to fully participate in the sessions. Activating the spiral nature of the curriculum enables students’ understanding to deepen over time. Tutorials will be arranged that allow students to explore their understanding of key terms from each of the life and social sciences. Content of lectures and group sessions is determined by the nature of the module and learning outcomes but also influenced by the range of programme concepts which provide additional context in which the content is both taught and learned.
  • Preparatory reading is provided prior to commencement of the module to enable students to engage at a pace according to individual needs. The module is supported by a VLE site which provides students with advance lecture notes, handouts, articles; it also provides opportunities to join discussion boards and use links to relevant web sites for all 3 sciences.
  • Module supervisors who are module team members are allocated enabling each student to seek academic support specific to their learning and the assignment for this module.
  • Module supervisors who are allocated to students with disabilities, which can affect their ability to produce written English, are guided in supporting their students by the University’s published guidelines (Annexe 3, University Code of Practice; Assessment Procedures).
  • The student is given a knowledge base that can be built on in future modules and subsequently used to inform their understanding of the bio-psychosocial nature of patients’/clients’ needs. This will form a foundation in order for the student to be able to, in the future, respond to unpredictable health care needs and show an awareness of bio-psychosocial health care needs. The module will enable the student to demonstrate how lifestyle, diversity and socioeconomic factors are taken into consideration in health care delivery.
  • Guided/independent study / online 75%
  • Scheduled learning and teaching activities 25%

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:

  • Formative Assessment:

    Summative sheets are provided on the VLE site after each lecture in all 3 sciences. These are designed to summarise the main points, indicating what students need to learn for this module. This is particularly important where the subject matter in text books covers a vast amount of information, far in excess of what is expected of students at this stage.

    In tutorials students are encouraged to participate using question and answer technique. Feedback is given on the reading and preparatory work they have completed.

    Academic supervisors give feedback to students who either email them or have face-face contact. This contact is to be actioned by the student and depends on their individual needs

    Revision sessions in all three sciences (one session per science) are timetabled towards the end of the 6 week’s theory

  • Summative Assessment:

    There is a 3 hour unseen examination which consist of 3 parts, Anatomy and Physiology, Psychology and Sociology. There are 50 marks available for each part. Each paper requires short answers. 100% LO 1, 2, 3

    The maximum marks available is 150 and this equates to 100%. 60 marks (40%) are required to pass. If a student fails they will resit the whole paper.

Reassessment Strategy

If the student is failed at the first attempt, one further attempt is permitted. The student will receive feedback from the initial assessment and advice and guidance will be given to aid successful completion of the module.
Re-assessment will take place normally at the next assessment period. The examination paper will be similar but not identical to the paper previously sat.

Arrangements for Revision and Private Study

Module Constraints

No pre/post-requisite requirements have been recorded for this module.

Indicative Content

Anatomy and Physiology:
” Cardiovascular system
” Blood
” Renal system
” Digestive system
” Nervous system
” Endocrine system
Psychology:
” Perspectives 1 and 2 – psychodynamic behavioural and cognitive
” Learning theories- part 1 and 2
” General perception-
” Memory
” Pain theories
Sociology:
” Introduction to sociology
” Functionalism and the sick role
” Marxism
” Social action theory
” Culture health and illness
” Symbolic interactionism and communication

Click here for the Reading List

14209: Drama and Performance

16/17 Session, Semester 2

Basic Information

Module Level Level 4
Nature of Study Taught Module
Credits 20
European Credit Transfer Scheme 10
Probable Attendance 50
Location Hull Campus
This module is not available as a Free Elective
This module is not available as a postgraduate training module
This module is available to Exchange students

Module Rationale

The formative assessment comprising the analysis of one scene in performance (FA1) will enable students to develop skills of close reading and then to communicate how the chosen scene might work in performance. Discussion in seminar of (anonymised) sample analyses of a scene will introduce students to different critical and dramaturgical approaches and encourage them to evaluate their appropriateness and relative merit. The formative feedback / ‘feed forward’ guidance from this assessment will enhance analytical skills and prepare the student for the first summative assessment (SA1).

For SA1 (1,500 words, 30%), students may opt to write either a critical essay on a play studied on the module or a critical review of a performance of one of the set plays. Both forms of assessment will require students to demonstrate a clear understanding of theories of drama and performance and their application to a chosen text. FA1 and SA1 both help to prepare the second summative assessment (SA2: 2,500 words, 70%).

SA2 (2,500 words, 70%) will require students to demonstrate a good contextual knowledge and understanding of specific plays and to extend their knowledge of dramaturgy (developed in FA1 and SA1) to a comparative study of two further plays studied on the module. For SA2, students choose a question from a list provided in the module handbook, and must then complete the more complex task of performing a detailed comparative textual analysis of two of the set plays (excluding the play written on in SA1). The greater complexity of SA2 accounts for and warrants its much higher weighting (70%).

Aims and Distinctive Features

1. To introduce a range of plays from diverse periods and equip students with the critical skills to analyse them as text and performance.
2. To provide an overview of the development of influential drama, staging techniques and the social and intellectual contexts which produced it.
3. To give students a substantial grounding in key critical and theoretical texts that have shaped theatre studies.
4. To enable students to interpret drama as a malleable form where direction and performance can open up very different readings.

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key concepts defining drama and performance (such as concepts of tragedy, comedy and tragicomedy; dramatic speech and dramatic action; conventions and modes of representation; the Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key concepts defining drama and performance (such as concepts of tragedy, comedy and tragicomedy; dramatic speech and dramatic action; conventions and modes of representation; the relationship between text and performance; and the interpretative implications of theatrical performance).
  • Demonstrate an awareness of theatrical and historical context in performing close and accurate textual analysis of a range of dramas.
  • Develop a structured and coherent argument, including a comparative argument, to deadline which makes appropriate use of a variety of library research resources, and follows stipulated English guidelines on presentation and referencing (provided on the English site on Canvas).
  • Communicate clearly and accurately in response to a variety of dramatic texts.

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The following learning and teaching strategies are used within this module:

  • 10 x weekly one-hour lectures
  • 10 x weekly two-hour workshops/seminars
  • 1 x two-hour revision session
  • The module will be taught by way of ten weekly one-hour lectures, one on each of the six set texts and four general lectures covering aspects of dramatic theory and practice and historical contexts unfamiliar to students at level 4. The lectures will be complemented by ten weekly two-hour workshops/seminars in which students explore aspects of performance through close reading, discussion and workshopping of specific scenes. These workshops will enable students to grasp more fully the relationship between the verbal text and meanings released in performance. The final session will be a two-hour revision session to prepare students for the final summative assessment.
  • Additional one-to-one guidance and feedback is available in the scheduled weekly Module Guidance and Feedback hour and in the extended Feedback Hours scheduled in the department’s designated Feedback Weeks. This additional contact time further supports student learning.
  • Guided independent study including online 83%
  • Scheduled learning and teaching activities 17%

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:

  • Formative Assessment:
    An analysis of one scene in performance (drawing on ways of performing a scene as explored in class workshop) (300 words)
  • Summative Assessment:
    Critical Essay (1,500 words) on one set play OR a Critical Review of a performance of one set play. Both forms of assessment will require students to link dramatic theory and practice.
    30% LO 1, 2 (partial), 3 (partial), 4 (partial)

    Comparative Essay (2,500 words) one a topic chosen from a list which encourages cross-period comparison between plays studied on the module.
    70% LO 1, 2, 3, 4

Reassessment Strategy

Reassessment will take the same form as the initial assessment for this module.

Arrangements for Revision and Private Study

Module Constraints

No pre/post-requisite requirements have been recorded for this module.

Indicative Content

This module will introduce students to a range of plays, in English and in translation, which have helped to shape contemporary understanding of theatre. The module will balance an historical reading of plays, as products of their time and the performance spaces for which they were written, and a contemporary reading of plays, as texts open to new interpretation each time they are performed. Topics will include dramaturgy and performance; tragedy, comedy and tragicomedy; ‘alienation’ versus naturalism; absurdist theatre, and theatre of cruelty.

Click here for the Reading List

General enquiries

University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull, HU6 7RX, United Kingdom

Telephone: +44 (0)1482 346311

Fax: +44 (0)1482 346511