University of Huddersfield Contact

By | 14th June 2017

University of Huddersfield logo

University of Huddersfield Contact

Contact Us

University of Huddersfield Switchboard Tel:

+44 (0)845 155 6666   +44 (0)1484 422288

Studying Here

ServiceTelephone NumberFax
University of Huddersfield Switchboard (Monday – Thursday: 8:30am – 5:00pm, Friday: 08:30am – 4:00pm)+44 (0)1484 422288+44 (0)845 155 666601484 516151 (uk)+44 1484 516151 (overseas)
International Office (e-mail)+44 (0)1484 472383+44 (0)1484 450408
Student Recruitment Team (email)+44 (0)1484 472625
Student Records Team (email)+44 (0)1484 473330
Student Support+44 (0)1484 472675+44 (0)1484 473120
Careers and Employability Service (e-mail)+44 (0)1484 472124+44 (0)1484 473120
Schools and Colleges Liaison Service+44 (0)1484 472282
iPoint (e-mail)+44 (0)1484 471001

Services to Businesses

ServiceTelephone NumberFax
Services to Business (e-mail)+44 (0)1484 473666

Other Services

Service
Telephone NumberFax
Students’ Union (e-mail)+44 (0)1484 473555+44 (0)1484 432333
Sports Hall (e-mail)01484 472093
Security01484 472550
Emergency: 01484 472222
DIGS (e-mail)+44 (0)1484 473104+44 (0)1484 473667
The University of Huddersfield (informally Huddersfield University) is a public university located in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England.

History

The present University of Huddersfield can trace its history back through several predecessor institutions.

An early failure (1825)

In 1825 there was an attempt to set up a Scientific and Mechanics Institution in the town. Supported by a group of donors, its patron was leading Whig and large local landowner Sir John Ramsden. Its aims were to instruct local mechanics and tradesmen in scientific principles relating to their work, through lectures and a circulation library, which by 1827 contained over 700 volumes. The financial crisis of 1825–1826 led to the failure of the institution’s bankers, and it faltered and later became part of the Huddersfield Philosophical Society, an organisation with which its rules now more closely aligned. Some 19th century students earned qualifications as external students of the University of London.