University Of Glasgow University Gardens

By | 6th June 2017

University Of Glasgow University Gardens

Description

1 University Gardens currently houses the School of Humanities’ Student and Staff Support Offices, the Andrew Hook Centre for American Studies, as well as Modern History, the latter of which occupies 1-2 University Gardens.

The house at No. 1 was begun in 1902 by Robert Ewan & Sons and designed in a loosely Italian or French renaissance style. It may be the work of either the father or his eldest son, as Robert Ewan Jr was made partner in the firm in the same year. It is a B Listed building and one of the two buildings in the terrace not designed by John James Burnet, possibly due to plot ownership. The street was initially known as Saughfield Crescent as it was sited on the former gardens of Saughfield House.

In 1922, the house was bought by the University for the Women’s Union to replace the inadequate premises in 67 Ann Street (now Southpark Avenue). Around this time shipowner John McKellar Robertson gifted 2 University Gardens to the University (this later became Robertson House). A room from this house was incorporated into 1 University Gardens and the remainder of No. 2 became a professorial house.

Summary

University Gardens, 1
1 University Gardens
Glasgow
G12 8LP
Record last updated: 29th Oct 2015

 

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University Of Glasgow University Gardens

    

Description

5 University Gardens currently houses Student and Staff support for the School of Critical Studies as well as English Literature, the latter being housed in 4-5 University Gardens.

No. 5 was one of four houses built by John James Burnet from 1882 to 1884 which were located on the north terrace of the then Saughfield Crescent. The crescent was sited on the former gardens of Saughfield House. The A listed building is designed in a restrained but eclectic Glasgow free style, fusing neo-Baroque with Arts & Crafts detailing.

The house’s first occupant was Robert Berry. He was Professor of Law from 1867 to 1887, Dean of Faculties from 1888 to 1896, and Sheriff Principal of Lanarkshire from 1886 until his death in 1903. No. 5 was then occupied by his son, Arthur John Berry, a Chemistry student at the University.