University of East London Educational Psychology

By | 29th May 2017

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University of East London Educational Psychology

MSc Psychology

This is a conversion course for students with a first degree in another subject area. It means you could go on and train to be a professional psychologist – for example, by studying for a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.

You may, however, simply want to study this course because you are interested in the subject, in which case you will return to your career enriched with knowledge of human behaviour.

A concentrated lecture schedule – Wednesday afternoon and evening for those studying full-time, Wednesday evenings for those doing the course part-time – means you can combine the study with your current commitments.

Some of our students have obtained a psychology degree overseas but have now moved to the UK and need to add the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) qualification to further their careers. This course ticks that box.

You will benefit from excellent and highly experienced teaching in an internationally recognised school close to the London 2012 Olympic Park in Stratford, in a vibrant area with shopping centres and transport hubs.

University of East London Educational Psychology

(1) This hugely popular conversion course for students with first degrees in other areas is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC). GBC is an important requirement for becoming a professional psychologist in areas such as clinical and educational psychology.

(2) The one-year course is ideally suited to busy professionals, with lectures scheduled on Wednesday afternoon and evening each week. It is intensive and you will need to study outside scheduled teaching days – but you can combine it with work. You can also study part-time over a longer period.
(3) You will be studying in a school with an international reputation. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework survey rated 43 per cent of our research ‘internationally excellent’ and a further 25 per cent as ‘world-leading’ – the highest accolade.