University of chester vice chancellor salary

University of chester vice chancellor salary

The University of Chester has revealed its vice chancellor Professor Tim Wheeler received an annual salary of £255,000 in the last financial year.

However, Professor Wheeler’s bumper wage is below the national average of £272,000 for vice chancellors according to details obtained from Freedom of Information (FOI) requests submitted by the University and College Union (UCU) which represents lecturers.

But his £255,000 wage has risen considerably since The Chronicle reported he was earning £190,000 five years ago.

The FOI response also reveals five senior University of Chester managers come under the remuneration band covering £100,000-£149,999.

‘Named and shamed’

However, the initial failure to respond to the FOI meant the UCU included the university in its 24-strong ‘named and shamed’ list alleging lack of transparency. The university has now offered an explanation and this week answered all the questions in response to a follow-up enquiry by The Chronicle.

University of chester vice chancellor salary

Professor Tim Wheeler, who became principal of University College Chester in 1998 and the first ever vice chancellor in 2005 after it became a university, has overseen a massive expansion bringing millions of pounds to the region. But according to The Complete University Guide the university has fallen in the rankings from 68th in 2013 to 93rd now.

And critics such as Chester Community Voice say areas like the Garden Quarter have become imbalanced due to the influx of students.

Vice-chancellor of the University of Chester Professor Tim Wheeler, artist John Baldwin and director of the University of Chester China Centre Dr Haili Ma

China and the Far East are being targeted as part of its future growth strategy which has included overseas trips by the vice chancellor who has visited China to foster strong working relationships.

And the FOI response reveals he took three economy return flights in the financial year ending July 31, 2015, costing a total of £1,460.