University of chester 175th anniversary

By | 8th May 2017

University of chester 175th anniversary

University of Chester logo

University’s 175th anniversary celebrations reach new heights.

Posted on 25th June 2015

The summit of one of the UK’s highest mountains was the stage for one of the final events to mark a year of celebrations at the University of Chester.

Rev Canon Dr Peter Jenner and fellow ‘mountaineer’, Pro Vice Chancellor Chris Haslam, proudly show-off their University of Chester Snowdon 175 T-shirts and event entry passes.
Rev Canon Dr Peter Jenner and fellow ‘mountaineer’, Pro Vice Chancellor Chris Haslam, proudly show-off their University of Chester Snowdon 175 T-shirts and event entry passes.

Wearing commemorative T-shirts, staff and students with their families and friends scaled the heights of Snowdon on Saturday (June 20) to signify the close of the University’s 175th anniversary year, with more than 100 people climbing 3,560 feet to the top of the highest mountain in England and Wales.

Nine months in planning, the event was organised by the University’s Staff Association, including Deslie Bailey, Simon Downes, Paul Fletcher, Chris Jones, Jane Thomas and Helen and Garfield Southall. Once at the summit, University of Chester’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Tim Wheeler and Rev Canon Dr Peter Jenner, Dean of the Chapel, led the celebrations.

Garfield Southall, Associate Dean of the Faculty of Science and Engineering, said: “The ascent was in mist and drizzle, which also added to the atmosphere but did nothing for the views! Everyone had a real sense of satisfaction at reaching the summit, and we can safely say that our achievement was literally one of the high points of the University’s 175-year celebrations!”

University of chester 175th anniversary

But the University team wasn’t alone in its quest to the reach the mountain top – hundreds of other walkers were also out to complete the ascent. Garfield explained: “Unbeknown to us, several other events had been planned by other organisations, so the mountain was very busy. This created a great atmosphere and made the occasion rather like a pilgrimage.

“Thankfully, the sun came out for the descent and we enjoyed a relaxed stroll down. On arriving back in Llanberis, we were treated to samosas and chapattis courtesy of fellow walkers from Khalsa Aid in Birmingham, which completed a wonderful day.”

All the walkers paid a £10 entry fee, most of which will be donated to local mountain rescue teams. Garfield added: “Local mountain rescue teams were involved in planning for the event from an early stage, but thankfully we didn’t require their services on the day.”