University of Cambridge Nobel Prize Winners

By | 8th May 2017

University of Cambridge Nobel Prize Winners

The Nobel Prize was established in accordance with the will of Swede, Alfred Nobel – inventor of dynamite and holder of more than 350 patents. Awarded annually since 1901, the Nobel Prize is the first annual international award to recognise achievements in Physics, Medicine, Chemistry, Peace and Literature. Nobel Prizes have been awarded to members of Cambridge University for significant advances as diverse as the discovery of the structure of DNA, the development of a national income accounting system, the mastery of an epic and narrative psychological art and the discovery of penicillin.

Affiliates of University of Cambridge have received more Nobel Prizes than those of any other institution.

  • 96 affiliates of the University of Cambridge have been awarded the Nobel Prize since 1904.
  • Affiliates have received Nobel Prizes in every category, 32 in Physics, 26 in Medicine, 22 in Chemistry, 11 in Economics, three in Literature and two in Peace.
  • Trinity College has 32 Nobel Laureates, the most of any college at Cambridge.
  • Dorothy Hodgkin is the first woman from Cambridge to have been awarded a Nobel Prize, for her work on the structure of compounds used in fighting anaemia.
  • In 1950, Bertrand Russell became the first person from Cambridge to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature, for his 1946 work, ‘A History of Western Philosophy’.
  • Frederick Sanger, from St John’s and fellow of King’s, is one of only four individuals to have been awarded a Nobel Prize twice. He received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1958 and 1980.