London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Wiki

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Wiki

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Wiki

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (informally the LSHTM) is a public research university on Keppel Street, Bloomsbury, Camden, London, and specialised in public health and tropical medicine and a constituent college of the University of London. It was founded by Sir Patrick Manson in 1899 and is one of the most prestigious institutions in the world in the fields of public health and infectious diseases, ranking highly in both national and international league tables.

The LSHTM’s mission is to contribute to the improvement of health worldwide through the pursuit of excellence in research, postgraduate teaching and advanced training in national and international public health and tropical medicine, and through informing policy and practice in these areas. It had a total income of £101.7 million in 2009/10, of which £62.5 million was from research grants and contracts

The school was founded in 1899 by Sir Patrick Manson as the London School of Tropical Medicine after the Parsi philanthropist Bomanjee Dinshaw Petit  donated £6,666. It was initially located at the Albert Dock Seamen’s Hospital in the London Docklands. Just prior to this teaching in tropical medicine had been commenced in 1899 at the Extramural school at Edinburgh and even earlier at London’s Livingstone College founded in 1893 by Charles F. Harford-Battersby (1865–1925). Before giving lectures at St George’s Hospital, London, in 1895, Livingstone College afforded Manson his first opportunity to teach courses in tropical medicine.] Manson’s early career was as a physician in the Far East where he deduced the correct etiology of filariasis, a parasitic vector based disease, transmitted through the bite of a mosquito. On his return to London, he was appointed Medical Advisor to the Colonial Office. He strongly believed that doctors should be trained in tropical medicine to treat British colonial administrators and others working throughout Britain’s tropical empire. He also encouraged and mentored Ronald Ross during this period to uncover the correct etiology of malaria, which Ross subsequently discovered in 1897, winning the Nobel Prize for his efforts. The original school was established as part of the Seamen’s Hospital Society.

In 1920 the school moved, with the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, to Endsleigh Gardens in central London, taking over a former hotel which had been used as a hospital for officers during the First World War. In 1921 the Athlone Committee recommended the creation of an institute of state medicine, which built on a proposal by the Rockefeller Foundation to develop a London-based institution that would lead the world in the promotion of public health and tropical medicine. This enlarged school, now named the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine was granted its Royal Charter in 1924.

The school moved to its present location in Gower Street in 1929.

The school is London University’s major resource for postgraduate teaching and research in public health and tropical medicine. On successful completion of their studies, students gain a University of London degree.