King’s College London Grade 6

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King’s College London Grade 6

King’s College London Grade 6

Equal Pay at King’s

An Equal Pay Review compares the pay of men and women doing work of equal value and therefore establishes whether men and women are receiving equal pay. This analysis indicates there is no evidence of pay inequality for staff at King’s. This is true when comparing the salaries of:

  • men and women in the professoriate as a whole
  • male and female clinical academics
  • male and female clinical researchers
  • male and female clinical psychologist
  • male and female senior professional staff
  • male and female professional staff and
  • male and female academic, and research staff on the single pay spine.

The percentage difference between the average pay of men and women on each grade.

Academic Staff Lecturer Grade 6 0%
Lecturer Grade 7 -1%
Senior Lecturer / Reader 0%
Professors 5%
Clinical Consultants (CCCA/B) 0%
Clinical Senior Lecturer 1%
Clinical Lecturer 4%
Research Staff Grade 4 1%
Grade 5 0%
Grade 6 0%
Grade 7 0%
Grade 8 1%
Clinical Research Assistant -2%
Clinical Research Fellow 1%
Professional Services Staff Grade 1 0%
Grade 2 1%
Grade 3 -2%
Grade 4 1%
Grade 5 -1%
Grade 6 1%
Grade 7 0%
Grade 8 0%
Senior Professional Services 3%

 

Although the initial analysis does not immediately suggest that there is an equal pay issue amongst the professoriate, this group is a very diverse group both within and across a range of faculties. Looking at this group in more detail reveals that the difference in average pay between men and women varies across faculties. For example: in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities, and the Dental Institute there is no evidence of a gender pay gap amongst the professoriate, in almost all of the other faculties there are varying degrees of gender pay gaps, and in the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery the gender pay gap is reversed. Therefore, further analysis has begun to examine in more detail the professoriate pay gaps within each faculty.

Current – 2015
Men and Women on high salaried roles: staff on £60,000 and over Women Men Total Women : Men
Dental Institute 24 52 76 32%
Faculty of Arts & Humanities 27 66 93 29%
Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine 65 181 246 26%
Faculty of Natural & Mathematical Sciences 7 45 52 13%
Faculty of Social Science & Public Policy 24 71 95 25%
Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery 9 4 13 69%
Global Institutes & Centres 3 3 0%
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience 59 112 171 35%
Professional Services 31 58 89 35%
The Dickson Poon School of Law 11 27 38 29%
Total 257 619 876 29%

 

The table above shows the relative percentage of women and men who earn over 60K in the university. This confirms that it is the low percentage of women in senior (higher paid) roles that gives rise to the gender pay gap. This is the issue we need to tackle now. Overall, therefore,

The 20% gender pay gap observed at the university level is not because women receive lower pay for work of equal value – we need to increase the number of women in senior roles in order to reduce the gender pay gap.