Keele University Societies

Keele University logoKeele University Societies

Student Societies at Keele

The School of Law aims to offer a stimulating and supportive environment in which to study Law. Students may take advantage of seminars given by leading academics; participate in our mooting programme; attend careers talks given by leading law firms; and many other activities. Keele also has a Critical Legal Group which provides a forum for debating legal issues; and Keele Law Society which arranges presentations from barristers and solicitors, and organises a mock trial every year and also the Keele Bar Society which provides information and organises events for students interested in pursuing a career at the bar. The Keele Bar Society is also involved in the department’s mooting competitions.

Keele Student Law Society and Keele Bar Society

For information on the Keele Student Law Society, and Bar Society activities, please see their noticeboards on the CBC1 main corridor.

Client Interviewing

Students participate in teams of two with the aim of improving interviewing and inter-personal skills. The winning team represents Keele University at the national Client Interviewing Competition.

Mooting

A “moot” is a mock hearing before a higher court (usually Court of Appeal or House of Lords) concerning a point of law. It generally involves two teams of two students each who appear on opposite sides of the case. The objective of the moot is to present an oral legal argument to “the court” and to oppose the arguments of the other side. Students are usually given the facts of a mock legal case and then have 7-14 days to research the legal issues involved and construct a legal argument. The students present their arguments in “court” (usually in the School of Law) before a judge or judges (members of staff and/or practising lawyers from the Staffordshire area). The teams are judged on the quality of their research, the originality and coherence of their argument, and their oral advocacy skills.

At Keele, the mooting programme consists of a competition among Keele Law students in the autumn semester. The top four mooters are then selected to compete in the Knights & Sons Moot Court Final. The top two mooters from that competition then go on to represent Keele at inter-university mooting competitions, such as the Observer Moot. The mooting competition is open to students from all years and abilities.