Keele University Careers

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What will a Keele degree in Music or Music Technology mean for your future?

Music: Your Music degree from Keele will prepare you for a wide range of rewarding career paths. Many music graduates apply their transferable creative and intellectual skills to careers including media production, finance and banking, the law, publishing, broadcasting, marketing and consultancy. Keele Music graduates often continue their studies at PGCE, Masters and PhD level. You could also go on to work as a performer, composer, teacher (at all levels of education), music therapist, community musician, private tutor or sound technician, or in arts administration, orchestras, bands, a recording company, publishing, game design, film, radio and television.

Music Technology: A combination of individual and group projects prepares you for the collaborative environments of contemporary music, sound, software and media production. You’ll also have the skills you need to pursue a wide range of careers involving creative technologies, and to undertake further training in a range of related professions. These include broadcasting, recording, production, sound design, soundtrack creation, software design, song writing and performance, as well as original audio and audiovisual composition, studio work, and teaching. You might choose to work as a freelance sound designer for games and video, a sound technician, a community musician or a radio broadcast assistant. Graduates in music technology also develop careers as broadcast engineers, theatre stage managers, radio producers and multimedia specialists.

Music and Music Technology at Keele are proud of all of our graduates. Our students go on to develop diverse and exciting careers in the music industry, education, academia – and far beyond.  To find out more, watch these vodcasts from musical “Keelites” to hear directly from some of our graduates. They’ll tell you how their studies in Music and Music Technology at Keele prepared them for their career paths, and what they thought about the university, their degrees, and their lecturers.