Goldsmiths University of London Prospectus

By | 8th June 2017

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Goldsmiths University of London Prospectus

Goldsmiths University of London Prospectus 2017/2018

Goldsmiths University of London Prospectus 2017/2018

Goldsmiths University of London Prospectus 2017/2018 is available for download. Goldsmiths University of London undergraduate prospectus is available in pdf format for all prospective students.

Download Goldsmiths University of London Prospectus 2017/2018 here

Goldsmiths, University of London, is a public research university in London, England, specialising in the arts, design, humanities, and social sciences. It is a constituent college of the University of London. It was founded in 1891 as Goldsmiths’ Technical and Recreative Institute by the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths in New Cross, London. It was acquired by the University of London in 1904 and was renamed Goldsmiths’ College. The word College was dropped from its branding in 2006, but “Goldsmiths’ College”, with the apostrophe, remains the institution’s formal legal name.

Nearly 20% of students come from outside the UK, and 52% of all undergraduates are mature students (aged 21 or over at the start of their studies). Around a third of students at Goldsmiths are postgraduate students.

For more than 200 years, generations of students have received an education here on the site of Goldsmiths.

In 1792 the Counter Hill Academy opened its doors in New Cross, in a house built by Deptford distiller, William Goodhew. The Royal Naval School then bought the site, building what is now our Richard Hoggart Building in 1843.

The Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths acquired the school and reopened it in 1891 as The Goldsmiths’ Company’s Technical and Recreative Institute. With the dawn of the twentieth century, the Company handed over the Institute to the University of London. It was re-christened Goldsmiths College and the modern era of Goldsmiths had begun.

Our roots – two centuries of educational legacy

The Counter Hill Academy, a private boarding school for boys, stood on the site of modern day Goldsmiths from 1792 until 1838. After the Academy closed, the Royal Naval School bought the site. Over the next five decades they provided an education to the sons of officers in the Royal Navy and Royal Marines.

The Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, one of the most powerful of London’s ‘City Livery Companies’, purchased the site and buildings after the Naval School moved out in 1889. Two years later, The Goldsmiths’ Company’s Technical and Recreative Institute opened.

For 13 years, the Company ran a hugely successful operation. At its peak over 7,000 male and female students were enrolled, drawn from the ‘industrial and working classes’ of the New Cross area.