Ashridge Business School History

By | 6th April 2017

Ashridge Business School History

History and Heritage of Ashridge

The college was conceived at Ashridge House in 1921 when the house was acquired by a trust established by Andrew Bonar Law, a former Prime Minister; in 1929 it became a “College of Citizenship” established to help the Conservative Party develop its intellectual forces in struggles with left-wing organisations such as the Fabian Society. It became a cross between a think-tank and a training centre and had Arthur Bryant as its educational adviser. After the War the “College of Citizenship” was briefly re-launched but in 1959 it was re-launched again as a College to provide management training. In 2015, Ashridge Business School operationally merged with Hult International Business School, an American business school with campuses in seven cities around the world. As part of the merger, Ashridge Business School changed its name to Ashridge Executive Education.

 

Ashridge has always been a renowned seat of learning. It originated as a monastic order called the ‘College of Bonhommes’ in 1283 and returned to education in the twentieth century. The current building dates from the early 19th century and was designed by the architect James Wyatt. Ashridge House and Gardens are open for guided tours annually during April and August. (excludes Bank Holidays).

Ashridge has long been a place of learning. It originated as a monastic order called the ‘College of Bonhommes’ in 1283 and flourished as a seat of learning and debate.