Anglia Ruskin University Notable Alumni

Anglia Ruskin University Notable Alumni

Anglia Ruskin University has a proud history built on the success of several institutions since 1858. This page has been created because your University wishes to stay in touch with you, our alumni, to maintain a community that celebrates the institutions it has evolved from and into and the memories and successes shared by those who studied here.

Mission
The Development and Alumni Relations Office work hard to keep you up to speed and involved with your University through our alumni magazine, newsletter, individual faculties. We update you on University events and opportunities for you to interact with the University, each other and current students. We have several large international alumni branches with resident Alumni Ambassadors to support us. We are here to support you, so please don’t hesitate to contact us directly at alumni@anglia.ac.uk if we can be more involved with you, or if you wish to be more involved with the University.

Anglia Ruskin University has its origins in the Cambridge School of Art, founded by William John Beamont in 1858. The inaugural address was given by John Ruskin[7] (often incorrectly described as the founder; in fact he founded the Ruskin School of Drawing in Oxford). The original location was near Sidney Sussex College, later moving to its present location in East Road, Cambridge. In 1960 this became the Cambridgeshire College of Arts and Technology (CCAT). In 1989 CCAT merged with the Essex Institute of Higher Education to form the Anglia Higher Education College. The merged college became a polytechnic in 1991, using the name Anglia Polytechnic, and was then awarded university status in 1992.

Initially Anglia Polytechnic University (APU), it retained the word ‘polytechnic’ in its title because “the term ‘polytechnic’ still had value to students and their potential employers, symbolising as it did the sort of education that they were known for – equipping students with effective practical skills for the world of work”although in 2000 there was some self-doubt about including the term ‘polytechnic’ – it was the last university in the country to have done so. Wanting to keep the ‘APU’ abbreviation, a suggestion put forward by the governors was ‘Anglia Prior University’ (after a former Chancellor), but the Governors decided to keep ‘polytechnic’ in the title.