Abertay University Music

By | 4th April 2017

Abertay University Music

What you study

Sound and Music for Games is aimed primarily at students completing an HND in sound/music production or composition, and so runs only at third and fourth year.

Year 3 of the programme is designed to take your existing professional skills and deploy them within the context of game production.  Across the year you will study game audio concepts and asset creation, in the process designing a complete sound library before implementing it and testing it using industry-standard middleware tools.  You will study sound synthesis, exploring how sounds can be designed and manipulated from first principles, and you will learn the vocabulary and grammar of sound and music for screen media by examining a century of examples drawn from cinema.  Putting all of this into context, you will work as part of a creative production team to produce a game prototype as part of a live project with an industrial client.

In Year 4, you have the opportunity to set the agenda.  By examining a current ‘hot topic’ in game audio, you will scope, specify and realise a single, large-scale self-directed project that allows you to develop your own professional specialism and refine your skills.

For more information on the course content, download the Programme information – BA with Honours in Sound and Music for Games

How you learn and are assessed

Our approach to assessment recognises the practical and applied nature of the subject.  Most work is assessed by portfolio, with most portfolio submissions consisting of a finished piece, a piece of contextual written work which provides some critique and analysis, and evidence of work-in-progress, usually in the form of a blog or online workflow.  You will have opportunities to present interim work for feedback before submission, and deadlines, rather than the clock in the exam room, provide the pressure of time for our assessments, an approach which mirrors working practices in industry.

Examination techniques

The programme is assessed entirely by portfolio.  Most portfolio submissions consist of a finished piece, a piece of contextual written work provides some critique and analysis, and evidence of work-in-progress, usually in the form of a blog or online workflow.  There are no formal written examinations.